RUM AND COKE - Was Cuba Anything Like You Thought? - Nena

Miami, Florida

PLAY DESCRIPTION

Pain is funny. Separation, death, humiliation, all of it fodder for the characters Camila encounters on her trip to Havana via Miami in this ferociously comic and moving tale about life seen through the Cuban lens. 

MONOLOGUE DESCRIPTION

Time: Contemporary                                

Situation: Nena, a former Tropicana Showgirl who got demoted to bathroom duty when her fiancée escaped to Miami, is curious about Cuban American Camila’s impressions of Havana. Nena describes the joy she used to feel onstage and how she couldn’t give it up, not even for her true love.

Subject Matter: Love, Curiosity, Wistfulness, Power, Singing, Identity, Cuba, USA, Tropicana, Heartbreak

Note from Playwright: When I was 15 years old I saw Whoopi Goldberg's ON BROADWAY on HBO and I wanted to write a solo piece.  When I went to Cuba for the first time, a director suggested I use my trip as the framework for some monologues I had written and RUM AND COKE was born.

Supplemental Information: To hear the song “Son de la Loma” by the Trio Matamoros that Nena sings in this monologue, visit:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a_yMx22nzZk

To inquire about reading the full script of RUM AND COKE, contact Carmen directly at carmen@carmenpelaez.com.

Carmen’s great aunt Amelia Pelaez, the renowned Cuban painter, was one of the main inspirations for the play RUM AND COKE. Learn more about Artist Amelia Peláez here: Amelia Pelaez Foundation 

DOWNLOAD INFORMATION

After your purchase is complete, check your e-mail for an order confirmation and invoice. (Sometimes you receive two confirmations; check both.) The order confirmation will contain a link in blue text to a PDF containing: 

  • Full Monologue
  • Character Information
  • Important Contextual Information

 

According to the terms of your license, you are permitted to download the PDF 2 times only. The access link will expire 48 hours after the time stamp on the invoice.

  • Price:$2.99
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  • Source
    One-Act Play
  • Character Age
    Adult 20-30, Adult 30-40
  • Character Gender Ident./Sexual Orient.
    Female
  • Character Ethnicity
    Latin@/x - Hispanic, Caribbean
  • Character Special Traits
    Singer, Dancer, Accent
  • Genre
    Comedy, Tragedy, Tragicomic, Solo Play
  • Period
    Contemporary
  • Length
    2 min or less
  • Writer Gender Identity/Sexual Orientation
    Female
  • Writer Ethnicity
    Latin@/x - Hispanic, Caribbean
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