Audubon's Rifle - John James Audubon

Fitchburg, Massachusetts

MONOLOGUE DESCRIPTION 

Time: Early 1800’s                          

Situation: John James Audubon, before achieving renown with his great "Birds of America" series, speaks to a reporter and shares his method for producing paintings that are amazingly lifelike.

Subject Matter: Audubon, Birds, Wildlife, Art, Painting, Hunting

Note from Playwright: I've long be both disturbed and fascinated by Audubon. A great artist, yes. But few people know that he personally killed thousands of birds in order to produce his paintings. This monologue is adapted from a longer play that explores the paradox of Audubon's life and work. 

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  • Full Monologue
  • Character Information
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  • Source
    Stand-Alone Monologue
  • Character Age
    Adult 20-30, Adult 30-40
  • Character Gender Ident./Sexual Orient.
    Male
  • Character Ethnicity
    White, European
  • Genre
    Adaptation, Historical Drama, Drama
  • Period
    Pre-Contemporary
  • Length
    2 min +
  • Writer Gender Identity/Sexual Orientation
    Female
  • Writer Ethnicity
    Asian/Asian American, Multiracial
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